Supplementary material from "Scaffolding layered control architectures through constraint closure: insights into brain evolution and development"

Posted on 22.11.2021 - 06:08
The functional organization of the mammalian brain can be considered to form a layered control architecture, but how this complex system has emerged through evolution and is constructed during development remains a puzzle. Here we consider brain organization through the framework of constraint closure, viewed as a general characteristic of living systems, that they are composed of multiple sub-systems that constrain each other at different timescales. We do so by developing a new formalism for constraint closure, inspired by a previous model showing how within-lifetime dynamics can constrain between-lifetime dynamics, and we demonstrate how this interaction can be generalized to multi-layered systems. Through this model, we consider brain organization in the context of two major examples of constraint closure—physiological regulation and visual orienting. Our analysis draws attention to the capacity of layered brain architectures to scaffold themselves across multiple timescales, including the ability of cortical processes to constrain the evolution of sub-cortical processes, and of the latter to constrain the space in which cortical systems self-organize and refine themselves.This article is part of the theme issue ‘Systems neuroscience through the lens of evolutionary theory’.

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Wilson, Stuart P. Wilson; Prescott, Tony J. Prescott (2021): Supplementary material from "Scaffolding layered control architectures through constraint closure: insights into brain evolution and development". The Royal Society. Collection. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.5713114.v2
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