Supplementary material from "Rising floor and dropping ceiling: organ heterogeneity in response to cold acclimation of the largest extant amphibian"

Posted on 19.09.2022 - 05:49
Low temperature imposes strong selective pressure on ectotherms. To maximize their overall fitness under cold conditions, the ectotherms may either try to maintain their physiological activities through metabolic compensation or enter into metabolic depression; however, some species adopt both strategies to cope with different degree of cold. Nevertheless, how these two seemly opposite strategies are coordinated has rarely been elucidated. Here, we investigated the molecular strategy underlying the cold acclimation of Andrias davidianus, the largest extant amphibian, using multi-organ metabolomics and transcriptomics. The results showed remarkable organ heterogeneity in response to cold. While most organs showed transcriptional upregulation of metabolic processes, the heart exhibited downregulation. This heterogeneity explained the adaptive reorganization in resource allocation, which compensates for metabolic maintenance by compromising growth. Importantly, the cardiac function might constitute a ‘ceiling’ to constrain the space for compensation, especially under colder conditions. Additionally, the opposite transcriptional regulation of oxidative phosphorylation and other pathways might also shape the overall metabolic capacity under cold conditions. The heterogeneity in cold responses may have directed a shift in cold adaptive strategy from compensation to depression with a drop in temperature. These results provide a novel insight into the regulatory mechanisms underlying cold survival strategies of ectotherms.

CITE THIS COLLECTION

Zhu, Wei; Zhao, Chunlin; Zhao, Tian; Chang, Liming; Chen, Qiheng; Liu, Jiongyu; et al. (2022): Supplementary material from "Rising floor and dropping ceiling: organ heterogeneity in response to cold acclimation of the largest extant amphibian". The Royal Society. Collection. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.6204503.v1
or
Select your citation style and then place your mouse over the citation text to select it.

SHARE

email

Usage metrics

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

AUTHORS (9)

Wei Zhu
Chunlin Zhao
Tian Zhao
Liming Chang
Qiheng Chen
Jiongyu Liu
Cheng Li
Feng Xie
Jianping Jiang
need help?