Supplementary material from "Raw meat-based diets for companion animals: a potential source of transmission of pathogenic and antimicrobial-resistant Enterobacteriaceae"

Published on 2019-10-01T12:38:22Z (GMT) by
Feeding pets raw meat-based diets (RMBDs) has become increasingly popular but may constitute a risk due to the contamination with pathogenic and antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate commercially available RMBDs with regard to microbiological quality and occurrence of AMR Enterobacteriaceae. Of 51 RMBD samples, 72.5% did not meet the microbiological standards for Enterobacteriaceae set out by EU regulations for animal by-products intended for pet food. Furthermore, <i>Salmonella</i> was detected in 3.9% of the samples. AMR bacteria were found in 62.7% of the samples, the majority thereof were resistant to third-generation cephalosporins due to the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) including CTX-M-1, which is widespread in livestock, and CTX-M-15, which is the most common ESBL variant worldwide. Colistin- and aminoglycoside-resistant isolates, producing MCR-1 and RMTB, were identified in 3.9 and 2% of the samples, respectively. The majority of the AMR <i>Escherichia coli</i> belonged to commensal groups A or B1 and were associated with clonal complexes (CC)155 and CC10. Two belonged to the emerging extraintestinal pathogenic CC648, and one to the globally disseminated uropathogenic <i>E. coli</i> sequence type (ST)69, suggesting zoonotic potential. The microbiological quality and the high prevalence of AMR producing Enterobacteriaceae in RMBDs raise concerns for animal and public health.

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Nüesch-Inderbinen, Magdalena; Treier, Andrea; Zurfluh, Katrin; Stephan, Roger (2019): Supplementary material from "Raw meat-based diets for companion animals: a potential source of transmission of pathogenic and antimicrobial-resistant Enterobacteriaceae". The Royal Society. Collection. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.c.4684118.v1